How Do I Donate My Eggs?

 

How Do I Become An Egg Donor

By deciding to become an egg donor you will be providing a chance for intended parents to start a family who for a variety of reasons are unable to have a child themselves.

Egg Donors will be compensated for donating eggs, the level for which will depend on your country of residence, previous donations and biological factors.

Our US citizen egg donors can expect to receive anywhere between $7,000 for first time egg donors and $10,000 plus for experienced donors.
Some of our VIP donors are achieving upwards of $30,000 for an egg donation. These are for academically very high standard donors.

As an indication, people providing donor eggs residing in the UK can expect to receive approximately £700*. All donations will be made in licensed facilities in line with the governing bodies guidelines for that particular country.

BECOME AN EGG DONOR REGISTRATION FORM

 


To Be Eligible to Become An Egg Donor, Your Answers To The Following Questions Should Be Yes:

  • Have a BMI of 30 or below
  • Be between 20-35 years of age within the USA (18-35 in the UK)
  • Of generally good health
  • No family history of recurrent bad health problems

If you would like to become one of our registered Egg Donors and can answer YES to the above questions, please complete the online registration and we will contact you to discuss the application in further detail. If you would like to learn more about Premier Egg Donors or learn more about egg donation visit our About Us Page

*This is subject to change and can be adjusted in line with HFEA guidelines in the UK and ASRM guidelines in the USA.
 

How Much Will I Get Paid If I To Be An Egg Donor?

As an Egg Donation Agency our Egg Donors will be compensated for donating eggs, the level for which will depend on your country of residence, previous donations and biological factors.

Our US citizen egg donors can expect to receive anywhere between $7,000 for first time egg donors and $10,000 plus for experienced donors.
Some of our VIP donors are achieving upwards of $30,000 for an egg donation. These are for academically very high standard donors.

As an indication, people providing donor eggs residing in the UK can expect to receive approximately £700*. All donations will be made in licensed facilities in line with the governing bodies guidelines for that particular country.

The fees an egg donor can charge for an egg donation depends on a number of factors including:

  • Country of residence
  • Previous experience of egg donation
  • Biological Factors
  • The Compensation intended parents are prepared to pay

 

EGG DONOR APPLICATION FORM 

For us to provide you with an indication of the level of compensation available to you, please complete the Egg Donor Application Form to apply to be an egg donor and we will then contact you to discuss the fee schedule.


Who Can Be An Egg Donor?

group of egg donors

Commonly, egg donors must be a certain age, usually 21, and be no more than 35. The lower limit ensures that a woman can legally enter into acontract. The upper limit reflects the fact that older women respond

less well to fertility drugs. There is also a chance that an older woman's eggs will be abnormal, making pregnancy less likely or increasing the risk of a birth defect.

Some programs prefer to use donors who have already given birth or successfully donated eggs. It is believed that they are more likely to be fertile and it is easier to anticipate their feelings about having genetic offspring born to someone else.

 

What Does Being An Egg Donor Involve?

If you apply to become an egg donor you may have several medical visits before you are accepted. These visits will include a physical and gynecological exam, a medical and family history, blood and urine tests, and a psychological evaluation. You will also discuss your rights and responsibilities with a program representative. A donation will not occur unless you are accepted, matched with a woman who will receive your eggs, and give your consent.

Using donated eggs to establish a pregnancy involves in vitro fertilization (IVF). First, you will take a series of fertility drugs (some of which must be injected) to stimulate your ovaries to produce many eggs at on

e time. While using the drugs, you will have frequent medical tests. Removing the eggs from your ovaries involves a minor surgical procedure. After you recover from egg retrieval, your part of the treatment cycle is finished.

Your eggs will then be mixed with sperm from the intended father in the clinic's laboratory. If embryos result, they will be grown in a lab dish before one or more are transferred into the uterus of the recipient. If she becomes pregnant and delivers a child, she will be the birth mother and legal mother of that child even though the child will be genetically related to you.

 

Who Will Use My Eggs?

Who can be an egg donor

Egg donation is a treatment option for women who do not produce enough normal eggs but are otherwise able to be pregnant. Some of these women have malfunctioning ovaries or entered menopause at an early age. Others are at an age when they produce eggs less readily, even with fertility drugs. Still others tried standard IVF but produced poor quality eggs or embryos.

Less commonly, women decide to use donor eggs because they are aware of an increased risk for inherited disease in their biological offspring. For example, the woman herself may be healthy, but she and her partner may both carry a gene for the same disease. This creates a risk in the child if it inherits the altered gene from both parents. Using an egg donor who does not carry the gene eliminates this risk.

Who will use your eggs depends on the policies of the program. Most often, donor eggs are used by women in their late 30s or 40s who are attempting to become pregnant. Very few women under the age of 36 use donor eggs. Programs have various upper age

limits for recipients. Some programs will allow women over age 50 to be recipients.
Most programs will treat unmarried women who are trying to become pregnant without a male partner and who require donor spermas well as donor eggs. Some programs match an egg donor with more than one recipient.

If you have concerns about who might receive your eggs, discuss them with the program before agreeing to become a donor. Some programs allow donors to place restrictions on the use of their eggs. However, no program can guarantee how your eggs will be used.

 

Will The Recipient Know Who I Am?

Most programs keep the identity of donors confidential (often called "anonymous donation"). If you enter one of these programs, the recipient will have important information about you, but you will never meet or know each other's names. Other programs are more open. They may accept:

  • Donors willing to be identified later: Some donors give permission to be contacted once the child reaches a given age.
  • Donors willing to meet the recipients: In some programs, the donor and recipient meet to get to know each other and to ask questions.
  • Donors who want ongoing relationships with recipients: Some programs help donors maintain contact with the recipients, through an occasional photo or card, or a closer role as a special family friend.
  • Donors who already have relationships with recipients: A recipient may contact a fertility program after she has already asked a friend or relative to donate.

No single type of arrangement is right for everyone. Each presents unique challenges during and after the donation.


What Is The Egg Donation Process?

These are the standard steps in the process and the risks:

Stopping your normal cycle: You may be prescribed a medication for one or more weeks to temporarily halt your ovaries' normal functioning.

This makes it easier to control your response to fertility drugs. A doctor or nurse will give you an injection or instruct you about how to inject the medication daily at home.

The risks: The medications can cause hot flashes, vaginal dryness, fatigue, sleep problems, body aches, mood swings, breast tenderness, headache, and/ or vision problems.

Stimulating egg production: In a normal menstrual cycle, one egg matures and, at ovulation, is released from an egg-containing sac (called a follicle) on the ovary. In egg donation, the goal is to obtain several mature eggs. You will be prescribed medication to stimulate your ovaries to mature more eggs than normal (called "controlled hyperstimulation"). The medications are similar to the hormones that your body produces, but at much higher doses. These medications must be injected (either under your skin or into a muscle). Treatment will start on a specific day of your cycle and continue for about ten days. You will be shown how to inject the medications. If you are unable to inject yourself reliably, you will need someone else to do it for you.

 

If you would like to become a registered Egg Donor with us. Simply complete our online Egg Donor Application Form

COMPLETE EGG DONOR APPLICATION FORM